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2018 Annual Meeting Update.


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2018 Annual Meeting Update.


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ANNUAL MEETING UPDATE

RSVP & Absentee ballot

The Sunday's Child annual meeting is right around the corner and we're gearing up for another great year of awarding grants to deserving Escambia and Santa Rosa County non-profits. Join us this year as we hear from the grant finalists and vote on which four non-profits will be awarded a Sunday's Child grant this year. 

JUNE 24, 2018•  1:00-4:30PM  •  PENSACOLA IMPROV CENTER  •  RSVP


MISSION

To promote equality and inspire inclusion across the community by awarding grants for significant charitable and economic initiatives.

VISION

A fully accepting and inclusive Pensacola that embraces the LGBT citizens and their contributions to the community.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

  • To serve the community.
  • To promote a wider visibility of the LGBT community.
  • To promote a wider acceptance of the LGBT community by setting a philanthropic example.

Our ANNUAL MEETING

Join us for an afternoon of fun and friends Sunday, June 24, 2018 from 1:00 PM to 4:30 PM at the Pensacola Improv Center located at 375 North Pace Blvd, Pensacola, FL 32505.  Experience the excitement of awarding $100,000 to 4 non-profits in Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties. There are eight finalists:  

Animals, Environment & Recreation: 

Bream Fishermen Association, Inc.
    “Detective Oyster-Sleuthing for Contaminants”

Navarre Beach Sea Turtle Conservation Center, Inc.
    “Under Sail at NBSTCC” 

Health & Wellness: 

Feeding the Gulf Coast
    “Fresh and Cool: Constructing a Cooler for Produce Storage and Sorting”

Okaloosa AIDS Support and Informational Services, Inc. d/b/a OASIS Florida
    “Mobile Outreach Program” 

Arts, Culture & Education: 

Capstone Adaptive Learning and Therapy Centers, Inc.
    “Capstone Pet Barkery”

Boys and Girls Clubs of the Emerald Coast
    “S.T.E.M Revolution” 

LGBT, Diversity, and Inclusion

Pensacola Opera, Inc.
    “As One”

Pensacola Little Theater, Inc.
    “Project Humanity”

You can read about the eight finalists and their grant project summaries below.

Dress:  Business Casual

Please RSVP by June 21, 2018. If you have any questions, please contact info@sundayschild.org.

  • 1:00PM – 1:45PM Registration & Mixer
  • 1:45PM – 3:15PM Grant Awards Program/Presentation from Finalists
  • 3:15PM – 4:00PM Voting & Wine Reception
  • 4:00PM – 4:25PM Grants Award Announcement
  • 4:25PM – 4:30PM Closing Remarks

This is a private event for members of Sunday's Child or invited guests by the board of directors. No other attendees will be permitted.

If you are unable to attend, please complete and submit your absentee ballot.  You can do this by clicking the link below and completing the ballot electronically or by printing the ballot and mailing to:

Sunday's Child

PO Box 12972

Pensacola, FL  32591

The Absentee Ballot can only be submitted by one individual with a General Membership, or the one designated voter of an Ensemble Membership. 

BALLOTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY SATURDAY, JUNE 23, 2018. 

Have questions? Contact us at info@sundayschild.org.

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Letter from the President.


Letter from the President.


  Drew Buchanan,   President

Drew Buchanan, President

Our fourth year has flown by and very soon Sunday's Child members will award four $25,000 grants — $100,00 in total — for charitable projects that directly improve the quality of life in our community. The charities that applied are outstanding and their contributions to others is inspirational. Earlier this spring, the focus groups, led by our board members and driven by our members, worked passionately reviewing the grants and meeting the charities at site visits. They selected top finalists to compete for the grant awards. These charities are true to the mission of Sunday's Child: they contribute greatly to our community and demonstrate inclusiveness and equality in their values. Today, we will hear presentations from representatives of these selected organizations

Afterwards, Sunday's Child members will vote to select the four grant recipients. Each general membership casts four votes. Ensemble members collaborate and vote via their chosen designated voter. 

Included in this packet is a summary of the eight finalists and a ballot. 

We have seen tremendous gains in LGBT rights in recent history. Today, LGBT Americans are free to marry the person they love, free to fight and serve openly for their country, and free to be their true, authentic selves. The gains we have made toward equality in the last few years have been historic, but we are far from done.

It is because of your support and generosity that we are making progress, and I hope you are as inspired about these changes in our community as I am. Thank you for investing in our mission: To promote equality and inspire inclusion across the community by awarding grants for significant charitable and economic initiatives.

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2018 GRANT Finalists.


2018 GRANT Finalists.


After a rigorous grant review process, our grant selection committees, comprised of Sunday's Child members, have nominated the following eight non-profits to proceed to the next round where they will present their projects to the Sunday's Child membership 0n June 24, 2018.  The top 4 will be awarded grants of $25,000 each, regardless of grant category.

 
 

OASIS Florida

“Mobile Outreach Program”

Organizational Overview:

When David Neil was diagnosed with AIDS in 1989, he discovered that organizations that supported people living with AIDS did not exist in North West Florida. Until his death in 1991, it became his life’s mission to form an organization that could help prevent new infections and provide support for those living with the disease. Over time the organization grew and now covers four counties. The organization now known as OASIS was initially funded by individual donations, but it now has state and federal contracts which help it provide testing, prevention, case management and other types of care and support for people living with HIV. Funding under these contracts has not changed significantly but deliverables, caseloads, and the need for increased staffing has caused OASIS to rely more on grants and community support. 

Project Overview:

The Pensacola Bay Area is seeing a 16.2% increase in new HIV infections, a 37.1% increase in AIDS diagnosis, and a 27.8% increase in HIV related deaths.  These numbers reach a wide cross-section of the community.  People are not getting the care they need because stigma is often at the top of a list of multiple barriers preventing them from getting help. They may be afraid to visit the OASIS office or go to the health department lest they be seen. Testing and prevention education is essential to curb the spread of HIV.  OASIS’s Mobile Outreach Unit, which operates out of a discreetly identified RV, is designed to reach people who otherwise might not be tested either in their neighborhoods or at community events. The unit is staffed with trained HIV counselors that can do on-the-spot rapid testing, provide prevention education, and direct people to case management when needed; in short, virtually all of the services provided by OASIS’s main office. OASIS currently has two part-time employees staffing the unit, and it has seen testing and diagnosis numbers increase exponentially since it began operation.  With this grant, OASIS seeks to hire the equivalent of another full-time person specifically for this program to be assisted by current staff and volunteers.  It is anticipated that the increased testing numbers will provide the basis for additional state funding which will sustain the Mobile Outreach Program.  

Community Impact:

As OASIS has already seen, the Mobile Outreach Program has increased the number of people who are tested for HIV and who receive prevention education.   Testing and education as well as case management for those who tested positive, will have a direct impact on the health and wellness of the Pensacola Bay area, and is the only way to reduce the number of new HIV infections.  Increased testing numbers will provide the justification for additional or continued state funding to address this issue. 

Diversity Overview:

OASIS has a non-discrimination policy that was last updated in March of 2011.  However, OASIS reaches out on a daily basis to the LGBTQ and African-American communities in an attempt to reduce HIV infection through education and prevention. Its programs focus on underserved communities as well as affluent communities.  HIV does not discriminate, and neither does OASIS in its prevention outreach program.  


 
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Feeding the Gulf Coast

“Fresh and Cool:  Constructing a Cooler for Produce Storage and Sorting”

Organizational Overview:

Feeding the Gulf Coast, Inc. was founded and incorporated in 1981. In 1988, the food bank became a member of Feeding America, the nation’s largest hunger relief organization. Since its founding, the organization has distributed more than 220 million pounds of food to charitable feeding organizations across the 24 counties it serves, including nine counties in lower Alabama, eight counties in lower Mississippi, and seven counties across the panhandle of Florida. In 2017, the food bank distributed over 23 million pounds of food to more than 300,000 individuals through their network of over 400 partner agencies, consisting of church pantries, soup kitchens and other non-profit organizations.

Feeding the Gulf Coast works through member organizations to provide nutritious food to meet the challenge of feeding people who are hungry as a result of systemic poverty, personal crisis or disaster. Feeding the Gulf Coast also educates the public regarding domestic hunger, proper nutrition and other related issues.

Project Overview:

Feeding the Gulf Coast will install a 12’ x 40’ outdoor cooler at its warehouse in Milton, Florida. The cooler will expand their produce storage capacity, allowing it to store an additional 20 pallets of fresh produce each week, with each pallet weighing between 450-750 pounds. The cooler will be located adjacent to its existing facility and will provide for donated produce to be stored in proper temperatures while the staff inspects and sorts the donations for safety.

Community Impact:

With the addition of the produce cooler, Feeding the Gulf Coast estimates that it will be able to increase the amount of fresh produce provided to its agencies in the Florida panhandle by at least 15% and distribute an additional 318,000 pounds (approximately 265,000 meals) of fresh produce to more than 6,000 individuals by November 30, 2019. 

Diversity Overview:

Feeding the Gulf Coast has a comprehensive anti-discrimination policy. Its Board of Directors recognizes that having members from diverse backgrounds enriches the organization and strives to maintain diversity in the selection of Board members as well as staff. Employees annually receive training on workplace rights, sexual harassment, diversity, filing claims for harassment or wrongful termination, and Civil Rights training, and Feeding the Gulf Coast recently sent a representative to the Transgender Dynamics in the Workplace workshop sponsored by Sunday’s Child.

 
 

Capstone Adaptive Learning and Therapy Centers, Inc.

“Capstone Pet Barkery”

Organizational Overview:

For 65 years Capstone Adaptive Learning and Therapy Centers has advocated for inclusion and opportunity for individuals with developmental disabilities.  Capstone has successfully developed and implemented cutting edge programs and services for lower income children/students in our community who have significant physical, medical and cognitive disabilities.  Capstone programs include group homes, day programs for adults and high schoolers, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy and nursing services. They have recently opened a new youth/adult program and a sixth group home in Milton. A grant from Impact 100 allowed the opening of the Student Skills and Training Program and Capstone Pet Place where Capstone students will learn all aspects of running a retail store. In Pensacola, Adult Day programs serve over 70 individuals providing specialized care, therapies and nursing services, skills training and personal care for youth and adults with severe developmental disabilities. The High School-to-Work Transition Program provides students ages 14-22 with opportunities to develop appropriate social skills while continuing their educational experience and preparing them for life after graduation. 

Project Overview:

Capstone “Pet Barkery” Program will augment the existing employment/education training program at the Pet Place retail store in Milton. Students who work there will learn skills such as ordering supplies, baking, packaging, selling and marketing items, increasing their chances of later becoming gainfully employed. The “Pet Barkery” will bake home-made pet treats for sale at local farmers’ markets, festivals, businesses, and the new Pet Place pet supply store. Sunday’s Child funds would be used to purchase equipment to outfit the bakery including oven, hood, dishwasher, appliances, curriculum, and training materials. In addition, a portion of the funds would be used to order the initial inventory, and for marketing and salaries for staff to help with sales and skills training. Income from retail sales of pet treats will be used to help sustain the program. Students will receive individualized interpersonal skill instruction from para-professionals in 3 curriculum modules including communication, responsibility/teamwork and health/safety. Next, job readiness education, skills training and job development will be provided by one of 2 staff certified employment coaches.  

Community Impact:

There is a tremendous lack of job-ready skills training for area students with developmental disabilities. Capstone “Pet Barkery” program’s target population is a diverse group of Escambia and Santa Rosa County students between the ages of 14 and 22 with developmental disabilities including autism, cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities. Initially 60 participants are expected.  The goals of the program are to increase the independence and quality of life of students, and by extension their families, and to provide quality career training opportunity, thus increasing the pool of job-ready, eager applicants which will in turn improve community inclusion and decrease segregation. 

Diversity Overview:

Capstone has a comprehensive non-discrimination policy that has recently been amended to include gender expression and gender identity.  Representatives from Capstone attended the Transgender Dynamics in the Workplace workshop sponsored by Sunday’s Child.  Additionally, the concepts of diversity equality and non-discrimination are rooted in Capstone’s principals of human rights and fundamental personal freedom. 

 
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Boys and Girls Club of the Emerald Coast

“S.T.E.M. Revolution”

Organizational Overview:

For over 40 years, Boys and Girls Club of the Emerald Coast (BGCEC) has been in the forefront of youth enrichment, working with at risk young people and promoting a lifestyle of being a productive citizen. In Pensacola, Boys and Girls clubs have traditionally been situated in neighborhoods where the club is surrounded by young people who face a variety of socio-economic obstacles such as high crime, low income and academic failures. In 2017, Boys and Girls Clubs in Pensacola made a lasting impact directly serving 243 young people ages 5 to 18 years old. Of those, 94% qualify for free or reduced lunches, 76% come from single parent households, and 88% are African American. 

Project Overview:

Poverty, family stress, low academic achievement levels, and low adult educational attainment are all factors that place the youth in these communities at risk of educational failure in core subjects such as math and science. S.T.E.M Revolution plans to serve 30 teens ages 11-18 residing in Escambia County. S.T.E.M Revolution hub will meet the academic needs of at-risk students, afterschool and during the summer by piquing interest and honing skills in science, technology, engineering and math (S.T.E.M.). This hands- on learning will expose young people to S.T.E.M. careers following high school. This project seeks to take a desktop computer lab inside the Englewood Club site and enhance it with technological tools to transform it into a hub that will strengthen the current engineering (music studio) and technology programs offered at this site. Funds from Sunday's Child would be used to purchase equipment and supplies for subjects including 3-D printing and Design, Videography and Film, Horticulture/Aeroponics, Bio-Chemistry, Alternative/Renewable Energy, Geology and Biology.  Funds would also provide consumable supplies such as paper, pencils and printing, as well as field trips to local manufacturing plants. This project will recruit volunteer experts from community partners such as University of West Florida, Escambia County School District, Cox Media, Gulf Power, United Way of Escambia County and Boys and Girls Clubs of America to mentor program participants. 

Community Impact:

The target population for the project is 30 teenage members from Escambia County. Of those 30, 15 would be middle school students and 15 high school students from the identified at-risk population. S.T.E.M. Revolution programming seeks to ensure that young people graduate from high school on time with a plan for a sustainable career. 

Diversity Overview:

Although the Equal Employment Opportunity Policy Statement of the Boy’s and Girls Clubs of the Emerald Coast does not currently include sexual orientation or gender identity, this policy is expected to be under board review.  All BGCEC employees receive “Safe Zone” training which addresses LGBTQ awareness and alliances, and its Anti-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment policy includes sexual orientation.   BGCEC has also partnered with Planet Fitness to implement Judgement Free Generation Campaign focusing on anti-bullying and inclusion, and it offers transgender health benefits.  


 

Pensacola Opera

“As One”

Organizational Overview:

Founded in 1983 by a group of community volunteers (some of whom remain active Trustees), Pensacola Opera is the only opera company in Northwest Florida, and one of only five professional companies affiliated with OPERA America, in the state.  Pensacola Opera was recognized for its partnership with Escambia County School District by the Kennedy Center as one of its 2016 Partners in Education – the only opera company included in nearly 100 organizations chosen throughout our nation.

Project Overview:

Pensacola Opera seeks to present three performances of “As One,” a 75-minute, one-act opera which follows Hannah, a transgender woman (portrayed by two singers), as she discovers her gender identity and learns to love herself in a world where she’s not accepted. With music by lesbian composer Laura Kaminsky, libretto by gay librettist Mark Campbell, and transgender documentarian Kimberly Reed, the opera was inspired by the life experience of Kimberly Reed (Prodigal Sons).

Pensacola Opera’s production would be the State of Florida premiere of “As One.” To create awareness of and empathy for the transgender community, Pensacola Opera will amplify its performances of “As One” with an expansive schedule of community engagement events, programs, exhibits and film presentations. 

The grant funds would cover costs associated with presenting the opera, including fees for performers and musicians.

Community Impact:

Pensacola Opera hopes to accomplish the establishment of a dialogue which through education creates awareness and a dialogue of acceptance for all members of the LGBTQ community.

Diversity Overview:

The opera has long maintained a policy prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.  The opera provides its building (Pensacola Opera Center) for the Gay Grassroots’ Annual Gala and Holiday Party.  The opera is currently engaging in discussions with selected members of the LGBTQ community relative to their inclusion as members of the Opera’s Board of Trustees.

 
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Pensacola Little Theatre

“Projecting Humanity”

Organizational Overview:

The Pensacola Little Theatre (PLT) has been serving the Pensacola Bay Area continuously since 1936 – making it the oldest continually operating community theatre in the southeastern United States. The Pensacola Little Theatre, Inc. owns the Pensacola Cultural Center, which serves not only as home to PLT, but also Ballet Pensacola, West Florida Literary Federation, and Liberty Church – Downtown Campus. PLT operates a 12-month season with three separate theatre series targeting diverse audiences. Selections are based on history, trends, preferences, talent, and demand. The Mainstage Series provides contemporary and classic productions. The Treehouse Theatre Series provides quality family programming at an affordable price and offers parents and children an opportunity to work together on productions. Presented in an intimate space, the Studio 400 Series offers original plays and edgier, sometimes controversial subject matter.

Project Overview:

The goals of Project Projecting Humanity are to acquire the equipment necessary to present HD-quality films at PLT at a level a patron would expect at a modern movie theater.  It will also provide an opportunity for Pensacola’s LGBT film festival, Stamped, to grow and impact the community with their message as the PLT has committed to providing a venue and use of the new equipment to the Stamped Film Festival at no cost for five (5) years.  The funds will be used for the purchase and installation of a theater-quality projector and screen.  The assembly and installation will be done by a local vendor capable of completing warranty service. 

Community Impact:

The overall mission of the partnership between PLT and the Stamped Film Festival is to foster awareness, diversity, and inclusion through the unique medium of film. Often, when people see LGBTQ characters in a film or on TV, it starts to break down barriers in a non-threating way.  If the PLT has its own high-quality equipment, it will be able to attract more film festivals focused not only on issues of particular relevance to the LGBTQ community but to the entire Pensacola Area.  The Sunday’s Child grant will allow both PLT and Stamped increased ability to attract patrons to their respective events, thereby providing greater exposure to both organizations and working toward meeting their goals of fostering awareness, diversity, and inclusion through art.  

Diversity Overview:

PLT has a broad non-discrimination policy that applies to staff, volunteers, actors, crews, and patrons.  This includes the selection of plays that focus on topics that include many cross-cutting issues in today’s society.  Historically, the PLT has actively supported Stamped and other events relevant to the LGBTQ community. 

 
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Navarre Beach Sea Turtle Conservation Center

“Under Sail at NBSTCC”

Organizational Overview:

The Navarre Beach Sea Turtle Conservation Center (NBSTCC), founded in 2013, promotes sustainable coastal ecosystems along the Gulf Coast through community education programs and partnering with conservation research organizations. They work to empower individuals to act locally and globally to protect coastal ecosystems for current use and the enjoyment of future generations. Their goal is to educate the public about the importance of sea turtle conservation and local/global marine ecosystems and the diversity within those ecosystems.  

Project Overview:

As more people learn about the NBSTCC’s conservation and education mission and want to visit the facility, NBSTCC has been limited by its lack of physical space. The Center has been forced to turn away multiple school groups of 95 to 145 children due to lack of indoor space.  This represents both lost revenue and missed opportunities to act on their mission. NBSTCC is looking at other locations for expansion opportunities to increase its capacity for visitors and multiply the number of education opportunities for adults and school children alike.  A grant has been written and is being negotiated using funds requested through the Florida Opportunity Fund Venture Capital program.  In the meantime, the Sunday’s Child grant would provide the necessary funds to create a mobile expansion area on the north side of the existing building to include a sail cloth covered area, a misting system, picnic tables and interpretive signage on dune ecosystems and marine life.  This area will provide the space needed for these programs and will allow the organization to engage visitors with additional education opportunities and allow for larger groups to wait comfortably outside before entering the facility. 

Community Impact:

The NBSTCC is the only facility in the tri-county area dedicated solely to sea turtle conservation efforts.  Visitors are comprised of field trips from schools and organizations such as child care facilities, Boys and Girls Clubs, Girl and Boy Scouts, and NBSTCC has welcomed tourists from 50 states and five countries. 

NBSTCC anticipates this outdoor area will allow more groups to visit its facility and be exposed to its message of coastal and marine resource protection.   The increased number of visitors will help it move towards its ultimate goal of expanding to a larger facility, which will in turn engender greater community involvement.  

Diversity Overview:

NBSTCC has an all-encompassing non-discrimination policy.   They are committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of their staff, volunteers, vendors, visitors and their community. 

 

 

Bream Fishermen Association, Inc. 

“Detective Oyster-Sleuthing for Contaminants” 

Organizational Overview:

For over 50 years the Bream Fishermen Association (BFA) has assisted the city, county, and state as an environmental steward working to protect northwest Florida and South Alabama waters. Loosely organized in the mid-1960s by local fishermen who were concerned about the deterioration of regional water quality conditions, BFA was chartered as a non-profit organization in January 1970.  Since then, BFA’s objective has been to support, develop and implement programs that will improve the quality of the environment; protect and maintain the present wilderness in its natural undeveloped state; and advance the causes of plant, marine, and wildlife preservation. 

Project Overview:

Oysters are living meters of biological conditions that reflect the health of their environments. They filter water to obtain food and oxygen by pumping large quantities of water across their gills. During feeding, oysters take in phytoplankton, algae, bacteria, viruses, sediments and chemical contaminants. This improves water quality by reducing suspended sediments and contaminants. Project Oyster, the precursor to the proposed project, was born out of the loss of the first crop of oysters from the Pensacola Oyster Bay Company in 2017. After a total loss of oysters, BFA obtained baby oysters for interested citizens who live on the water to place in small cages off their private docks for monitoring purposes. Presently all the bodies of water that touch Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties are represented at volunteer dock sites.

Detective Oyster builds on the foundation of Project Oyster and integrates using oysters from the same waters as a bellwether for the overall health and condition of area waters. This project will fund student training for using the cutting-edge biotechnology to screen oyster tissue from local waters for pathogens. This grant will provide the materials and specialized testing supplies needed to monitor the oysters already growing on private docks. The oysters will eventually be harvested and tested for information about phytoplankton, algae, bacteria, viruses, sediments and chemical contaminates, providing invaluable information about the health of local waters in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. 

Community Impact:

The entire Northwest Florida and South Alabama communities will benefit, as good water quality is the basis of health and well-being. Chronic fecal contamination of waterways within coastal area waters of both the Pensacola and Perdido Bay systems represents both a public health threat and environmental problem.  The information provided by oysters is an important component in identifying water quality problems. 

Diversity Overview:

The BFA welcomes all individuals to participate in their program.  It has been working with area middle and high schools, as well as Pensacola State College, the University of Florida and the University of West Florida for several years. The latter institutions have policies in place to promote equality and inspire inclusion. The BFA work is inclusive and fully accepting of all members of the community, as evidenced by the diversity of its volunteers.  


This is a private event for members of Sunday's Child or invited guests by the board of directors. No other attendees will be permitted.

If you are unable to attend, please complete and submit your absentee ballot.  You can do this by clicking the link below and completing the ballot electronically or by printing the ballot and mailing to:

Sunday's Child

PO Box 12972

Pensacola, FL  32591

The Absentee Ballot can only be submitted by one individual with a General Membership, or the one designated voter of an Ensemble Membership. 

BALLOTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 2018. 

Have questions? Contact us at info@sundayschild.org.