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2017 Annual Meeting Update.


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2017 Annual Meeting Update.


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ANNUAL MEETING UPDATE

RSVP & Absentee ballot

The Sunday's Child annual meeting is right around the corner and we're gearing up for another great year of awarding grants to deserving Escambia and Santa Rosa County non-profits. Join us this year as we hear from the grant finalists and vote on which five non-profits will be awarded a Sunday's Child grant this year. 

JUNE 25, 2017•  1:00-4:30PM  •  MARITIME PARK STUDER BUILDING  •  FIRST FLOOR  •  RSVP


MISSION

To promote equality and inspire inclusion across the community by awarding grants for significant charitable and economic initiatives.

VISION

A fully accepting and inclusive Pensacola that embraces the LGBT citizens and their contributions to the community.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

  • To serve the community.
  • To promote a wider visibility of the LGBT community.
  • To promote a wider acceptance of the LGBT community by setting a philanthropic example.

Our ANNUAL MEETING

Join us for an afternoon of fun and friends Sunday, June 25, 2017 from 1:00 PM to 4:30 PM at the Maritime Park's Studer Building located at 350 West Cedar St. 1st Floor Pensacola, FL 32502.  Experience the excitement of awarding $128,500 to 5 non-profits in Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties. There are eight finalists:  Friends of the Escambia County Animal Shelter, Pensacola Symphony, Autism Pensacola, Pensacola Lighthouse Association, Children's Home Society of Florida, Independence for the Blind, Pensacola United Methodist Community Ministries and Manna.  You can read about the eight finalists and their grant project summaries below.

Dress:  Business Casual

Please RSVP by June 11, 2017. If you have any questions, please contact info@sundayschild.org.

  • 1:00PM – 1:45PM Registration & Mixer
  • 1:45PM – 3:15PM Grant Awards Program/Presentation from Finalists
  • 3:15PM – 4:00PM Voting & Wine Reception
  • 4:00PM – 4:25PM Grants Award Announcement
  • 4:25PM – 4:30PM Closing Remarks

This is a private event for members of Sunday's Child or invited guests by the board of directors. No other attendees will be permitted.

If you are unable to attend, please complete and submit your absentee ballot.  You can do this by clicking the link below and completing the ballot electronically or by printing the ballot and mailing to:

Sunday's Child

PO Box 12972

Pensacola, FL  32591

The Absentee Ballot can only be submitted by one individual with a General Membership, or the one designated voter of an Ensemble Membership. 

BALLOTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 2017. 

Have questions? Contact us at info@sundayschild.org.

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Letter from the President.


Letter from the President.


Chuck Presti, M.D., Founding Member & President

Chuck Presti, M.D., Founding Member & President

Our third year has flown by and very soon Sunday's Child members will award five $25,700 grants - $128,500 in total - for charitable projects that directly improve the quality of living in our community. The charities that applied are outstanding and their contributions to others is inspirational. Earlier this spring, the five focus groups, led by our board members and driven by our members, worked passionately reviewing the grants and meeting the charities at site visits. They selected top finalists to compete for the five awards. These charities are true to the mission of Sunday's Child. They contribute greatly to our community and demonstrate inclusiveness and equality in their values. At our annual membership meeting on Sunday, June 25, we will hear presentations from representatives of these selected organizations. Presentation requirements:

  • Limited to 7 minutes duration
  • No props
  • Limited to 2 members/participants of the organization

Afterwards, Sunday's Child members will vote to select the five grant recipients. Each general membership casts five votes.  Ensemble members collaborate and vote via their chosen designated voter. 

Included on this website is a summary of the eight finalists and an absentee ballot for those voting who are unable to attend the annual meeting. 

I look forward to seeing you at our third annual meeting and am grateful for your support and generosity.

- Chuck Presti, President

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2017 GRANT Finalists.


2017 GRANT Finalists.


After a rigorous grant review process, our grant selection committees, comprised of Sunday's Child members, have nominated the following eight non-profits to proceed to the next round where they will present their projects to the Sunday's Child membership 0n June 25, 2017. The top 5 will be awarded grants of $25,700 each, regardless of grant category.

 

The number of finalists per grant category:

Animals & Environment:  1

Health, Wellness& Recreation: 3

Family & LGBT: 1

Arts, Culture & Education: 3

Economic Development & Preservation: 0

 
 

Animals & Environment: Friends of the Escambia County Animal Shelter

Organizational Overview:

Friends of the Escambia County Animal Shelter (FOTECAS) was founded in July 2015 to supplement the resources of the Escambia County Animal Shelter, and to provide support, outreach, and education regarding animal welfare and responsible pet ownership. FOTECAS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit and has four board members.  It is 100% volunteer operated. 

Project Overview: 

The Dogs with a Drawl Transport Program seeks to obtain a van to transport animals from our over-capacity local shelters to areas of the country less burdened with pet overpopulation.  The transport connects to the established Puppy Pipeline in Hoover, Alabama, where pets are professionally transported to no-kill shelters in other locations where there is a high demand for adoptable pets.  The program currently operates with private vehicles.  Since the program began in May 2016, 334 cats and dogs have been transported and adopted.  Purchasing a van will allow FOTECAS to transport animals in a vehicle owned and insured by FOTECAS.  The van can be used locally to transport animals to adoption or fundraising events and for veterinary care. Operating costs, including insurance, are anticipated in FOTECAS budgets.  The van would feature Sunday’s Child logo.

Community Impact:

FOTECAS anticipates transporting 500 pets to new adoptive homes in 2017.  Each transport and adoption essentially saves two lives by moving one pet to a no-kill shelter in an area of the country where adoption demand is high, and opening up a space locally for another homeless pet to receive a second chance.

Diversity Overview:

FOTECAS has a written policy proscribing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion (creed), gender, gender expression, age, national origin (ancestry), disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identify, or military status, in any of its activities or operations.  This policy extends to selection or acceptance of members, volunteers, provision of services and selection of adopters.  FOTECAS is committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all volunteers and associates.  


 
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Health, Wellness & Recreation: Independence for the Blind

Organizational Overview: 

Independence for the Blind of West Florida (IB West) is the only nonprofit entirely devoted to educating the blind and visually impaired in West Florida.  IB West serves 200-300 people between the ages of 5 – 97 in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. The impact goes beyond these individuals because family and friends are also touched. The organization provides training to the visually impaired to become independent in many aspects of activities of daily living.

Project Overview: 

IB West’s project is SOAR (Safe Outdoor Area for Recreation).   Most blind people of all ages do not get enough physical exercise due to the difficulty in finding safe and accessible locations.  Obesity is rampant, leading to diabetes and other illnesses.

With money from a bequest, IB West purchased a half acre property next to their training facility. They want to develop a safe, appropriate place for blind children, teens and adults to engage in physical activity.  IB West seeks funds to fence the land, install a watering system, purchase two benches, three raised garden plots, and three picnic tables, including one which is wheel chair accessible.  They also plan to purchase equipment appropriate for the blind to play sport games. 

Community Impact: 

Visually impaired children and adults who do not get enough exercise may develop secondary health issues including depression, obesity, and diabetes.  By inviting sighted children and adults to participate, blindfolded, in activities at SOAR, IB West will foster an increased awareness of the challenges faced every day by visually impaired individuals while promoting camaraderie and fostering inclusiveness.  People with vision difficulty are much more likely to live in low income neighborhoods, where they are also less likely to have safe spaces to be physically active.   

Diversity Overview: 

In February 2017, IB West adopted Sunday’s Child non-discrimination language as to sexual orientation and gender identity.  They strategically recruit a diverse board of directors and do not discriminate against anyone who needs their help. Also, IB West stated while they have not targeted any specific groups, after participating in this year’s Sunday Child grant process, they are reevaluating and will make an effort to reach out to the LGBT community.

 
 

Health, Wellness & Recreation: Pensacola United Methodist Community Ministries

Organizational Overview: 

In an attempt to meet the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of people suffering from hunger, the Pensacola United Methodist Community Ministries (PUMCM) was formed in 2007 as a non-profit outreach organization at Richards Memorial Church in 2007.  More than 70% of PUMCM’s Brownsville neighbors live below the poverty level.  It is within walking distance of four homeless camps, three transient shelters and numerous abandoned houses without running water or electricity that serve as squatter shelters for some of their clients.

PUMCM works with many of Pensacola’s most vulnerable residents.  It helps people through a bicycle distribution program, community thrift shop, an addiction recovery program, hygiene and personal care items donation program, an emergency food and supplies donation program, GED and literacy tutoring, computer and English education classes, a community garden, and cooking and kitchen training opportunities.

Project Overview: 

Through their community kitchen and meal service program, PUMCM is able to offer the Brownsville community two meals a day, three days a week. They served 22,000 hot meals in 2016 alone. In order to increase efficiency and streamline their kitchen’s efforts to store food items, PUMCM seeks to replace their 14 used, stand alone, refrigerators and freezers with an energy efficient, walk-in refrigerator/freezer of the kind utilized in commercial kitchen operations. They estimate that the energy efficient walk-in unit would cost $900 annually to run, in contrast tothe estimated $2520 yearly for the stand-alone units. Additionally, the heat generated by the new walk-in unit will be vented to the exterior of the building, reducing cooling costs by 20% after replacing the 14 heat generating refrigerators. PUMCM anticipates another $125 monthly savings in reduced food spoilage.

Community Impact: 

With the combination of energy savings and reduction in food spoilage, PUMCM estimates that this project will save $7680 annually, which can be invested in the organization’s vast programing and services.

Diversity Overview: 

Last year, the PUMCM board unanimously adopted Sunday’s Child’s gender identity and sexual orientation inclusive, non-discrimination policy. Their policy can be seen posted within the dining hall and other locations. PUMCM is a Christian organization, but does not have any type of religious requirement for individuals seeking their services.   

 
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Health, Wellness & Recreation: Manna

Organizational Overview: 

Manna is a grassroots organization fighting hunger in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. Manna receives no government funding and has no affiliation to any national organization, yet every month Manna distributes enough food for over 25,000 meals, helping close to 900 families.  They operate three food pantries in the area that provide short term food assistance. They also operate programs specifically targeting children and senior citizens.  Manna maintains collaborative relationships with other organizations in the area to help families with issues they may be experiencing. Manna employs seven staff members and relies on volunteers from the community to operate pantries and programs. In 2016, Manna’s team of volunteers served approximately 367 hours every week. 

Project Overview: 

In April 2014 the Manna facility was flooded, resulting in the loss of equipment and food.  Since the flood, Manna has operated out of four separate buildings with about half of their former space.  Instead of expanding facilities in the current location, they purchased a building on E Street, out of the flood zone, which used to serve as a mill supply distribution business. The building will provide plenty of space and allow the entire operation to function under one roof again, but it requires improvements before it can become operational. 

Dry food stored in a warehouse is prone to weevil infestation and humidity damage. In order to protect foods such as cereals and grains, the temperature must be kept at around 70 degrees.  Cooling an entire warehouse space to that temperature is cost prohibitive. Manna seeks a Sunday’s Child grant to fund construction of a climate controlled dry room inside the new warehouse building.  The dry room will have a separate climate system, providing a cooler space to store dry goods. The grant would cover the cost of construction of the walls that enclose the room, as well as the climate control system for that room. If selected as a grant recipient, the dry storage room will have a Sunday's Child sign near the entrance for the employees and volunteers.This room will be large enough allow space for repackaging some bulk items as well as storage for around 30 pallets of dry foods. 

Community Impact: 

Maintaining the quality of the food that is distributed to the community is imperative. Grains, cereals and other dry food susceptible to pests and humidity are a big part of the nutrition program.  This dry room will minimize food loss and ensure that those items can be safely provided for years to come.  

Diversity Overview: 

Manna’s non-discrimination and inclusion policies specifically mention sexual orientation and gender expression. Manna provides help to any individual or family that is in need. AmeriCorps volunteers will provide diversity training to staff and later volunteers over the coming year.   


 

Arts, Culture & Education:  Pensacola Symphony Orchestra

Organizational Overview: 

The Pensacola Symphony Orchestra, now in its 91st season, has performed at the Saenger Theatre since 1982.  Since 1997 (20 years), under the leadership of Maestro Peter Rubardt as music director, the Orchestra has increased its programming and visibility, “stretching to reach new artistic heights.” The PSO currently serves the community through its six Masterworks concerts, two Pops concerts; Music for Families, and its annual music outreach program to all 5th grade students in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. 

Project Overview: 

Now in its second year, the goal of'Beyond the Stage’ is to transform lives and build community by connecting people through shared musical experiences. The programs under 'Beyond the Stage’ provide music instruction and interactive musical activities through partnership with existing local organizations.  Each partnership’s activities are tailored to the partner organization. Some of the audiences served include young children in hospitals as well as end-of-life patients in hospice facilities. In addition, they provide outreach to such organizations as the Great Gulf Coast Arts Festival and Autism Pensacola, among others. This broadens the reach of the PSO in the community.

This coming school year, the PSO plans to send specially trained professional musicians to instruct, mentor, and interact with students at six area middle and high schools. Engagements include hands-on experiences with musical instruments, interactive performances by small ensembles, master class instruction, group instruction, and mentorship of young musicians.  They seek funding for 6 outreach engagements 2 times per month for 11 months (132 events). Sunday’s Child funding will allow all schools to participate.  This outreach is a foundational element in a multi-year plan to increase community engagement.

Community Impact: 

This large group of students will work with PSO musicians as mentors and teachers. The impact on the students who will receive advanced instruction from PSO musicians will be to improve their technical proficiency and enhance their artistic appreciation, which has also been shown to carry over into academics.  Overall, the community will benefit from enhanced quality of life through these musical experiences.

 

Diversity Overview:

The PSO has a policy prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity or expression.  They have offered transgender-inclusive health insurance coverage since 11/01/15.  They have had no specific programs to engage the LGBTQ community this past year but said that among other things, they “celebrate the music of homosexual composers and performers in various concerts.”   They have a diverse board as demonstrated by a gay man as their board chair last year and a black woman in that position this year.  

 
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Arts, Culture & Education:  Autism Pensacola

Organizational Overview: 

Autism Pensacola, Inc. (API) was founded in 2002 to provide a community resource to improve the lives of those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).  Over the past 15 years, API has grown to 200 members and includes a number of programs and projects including the Parent Empowerment Program, Project Lifesaver and other networking support groups. They also provide training and social activities for those with autism and their families.

Project Overview: 

“Kids for Camp Summer Learning Lab,” an existing program begun in 2007 serving 60 campers each year, provides a month of fun activities along with intensive instruction for clients age 2-25 with ASD.  The agency offers $150,000 annually in scholarship support for this camp. The Sunday’s Child grant would provide 17% of this scholarship fund. Their goal is to help the campers maintain and increase skills during the summer break from school.  Through Camp, they seek to increase communication skills, as well as social and independent living skills, using Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), a therapeutic approach to understanding behavior and how it is affected by environment.  Teacher, staff and parent training in ABA is a component of the “Kids for Camp” curriculum. In addition, “Kids for Camp” provides a respite break for families. Neurotypical teenage volunteers act as peer buddies to those with autism. “Kids for Camp Learning Lab” was recognized by NBC Nightly News in its What Works series and as a PBS American Graduate Education Champion. 

Community Impact: 

API believes the community will benefit by having participants who will need less support than they would have if they had not had access to this summer activity.  They feel this program’s impact is not limited to those participants with autism but also includes the Camp teachers and parents. They believe the Camp teachers, who work with many children with various disabilities and even some neurotypical children, will be much more effective because they were trained in ABA at “Kids for Camp.”

Diversity Overview:

Autism Pensacola states that they promote tolerance, equality, and inclusion primarily focused on their vulnerable client population.  They say inclusion is one of their core values.  No official action has been taken over the past 12 months regarding diversity, but they felt this grant application process created awareness of the need to reach out to the LGBTQ community. 

 
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Arts, Culture & Education: Pensacola Lighthouse Association

Organizational Overview: 

The Pensacola Lighthouse Association, Inc. (PLA) is dedicated to the preservation of the historic Pensacola Light Station, which includes the Pensacola Lighthouse, the lighthouse keeper’s quarters, and all associated outbuildings and grounds. The organization was founded in 2006 to keep the history of the property (listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974) alive for future generations.  Their mission is to “preserve the past to enlighten the future.”  In 2008, the PLA received a 20-year lease from the United States Coast Guard granting them permission to maintain and operate the property as a public museum. They maintain Pensacola Light Station and provide accessible interpretation of the history of Pensacola as it relates to the lighthouse, as well as functional and architectural aspects of the lighthouse itself.

Project Overview: 

The PLA seeks funds to reconstruct the former 15’ by 20’ wash house using reclaimed wood from a contemporary building located nearby.  In reconstructing this piece of Pensacola Lighthouse’s history, the interior space of this structure will be configured as a new “Virtual Climb” exhibit which would provide an accessible alternative for those unable to physically climb or uncomfortable with heights. It is not feasible to install an elevator or ramps, which excludes any visitors unable to climb the tower’s 177 steps.  There are also Coast Guard-imposed height and age restrictions that children must meet to climb, and many families do not want to climb at all if it means that their children cannot participate. The consequence of these limitations is that a significant portion of the audience is left feeling that they have had an incomplete experience.  Given the main draw for the vast majority of visitors is the climb to the top of an active lighthouse, the creation of a comparable alternative has become a priority. The Virtual Climb portion of this project will address this directly, serving as an accessible, air-conditioned exhibit that represents the experience of being at the top of our tower.

Community Impact: 

The goal is for the Lighthouse to become an accessible, safe space for play and learning, providing an educational experience accessible to all visitors, regardless of age, height, or physical capability.  In addition, the PLA will participate in “Museums for All,” a program which allows guests with EBT cards to bring their families to the lighthouse free of charge.

Diversity Overview:

The PLA has worked to increase a more diverse presentation of history at the museum through such exhibits as the “Women Who Kept the Light,” which tells the stories of women who were lighthouse keepers in an era of a “separate spheres” ideology, as well as the stories of some of the first women to serve in the Coast Guard. They intend to present other stories of underrepresented segments of society in upcoming exhibits.  They also plan to participate in LGBTQ-oriented advertisement campaigns through Visit Florida.  PLA plans to hold an annual staff meeting to review and revise their non-discrimination policies as needed and they acknowledge concerns with current policy.

 

 

LGBT & Family: Children's Home Society of Florida

Organizational Overview: 

The Children’s Home Society of Florida (CHSF) was established in 1902 in Jacksonville, Florida to care for thousands of children in the area who were malnourished and alone.  A Pensacola office was established in 1920, and it currently serves Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties.

Project Overview: 

The project will support securing successful host homes who are fully accepting and inclusive of our homeless youth population in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties.   These homes will serve runaway and homeless youth (“RHY”) ages 16-21 including those who have behavior challenges, identify as LGBT, are pregnant, parenting, or human trafficking victims.   The project will support a recruiter to participate in outreach and innovative marketing strategies to recruit, secure and train host families willing to parent our homeless youth.  Sunday’s Child funding would also provide street outreach to our youth such as hygiene kits and conversation starters to build trust and provide them support and hope for their future. 

Community Impact: 

The expected impact on our community would be placement of RHY in a safe, stable environment with intensive transitional services, leading to independent living.   These efforts will reduce homelessness for RHY and youth who aged out of foster care.  The targeted training will enable families to work effectively with youth who are labeled as having behavioral challenges, or youth who experience negative social stigma related to being RHY, foster youth, LGBT or victims of human trafficking.

Diversity Overview:

CHSF has a non-discrimination policy implemented in 1999 which expressly proscribes discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. 

In 2015, Children’s Home Society of Florida began the process of becoming certified as an All Children, All Families organization through the Human Rights Campaign (HRC).  Through this program CHSF will create staff advocates who will serve as resources to clients or staff and will be able to provide guidance related to client care, case planning or self-care for those who identify as LGBT.  


 

Economic Development & Preservation: No finalist

After a thoughtful and intensive vetting process, the Economic Development Committee did not select a grant applicant for the Annual Meeting.  We welcome all grant applicants to apply again next year.

 
 

 

This is a private event for members of Sunday's Child or invited guests by the board of directors. No other attendees will be permitted.

If you are unable to attend, please complete and submit your absentee ballot.  You can do this by clicking the link below and completing the ballot electronically or by printing the ballot and mailing to:

Sunday's Child

PO Box 12972

Pensacola, FL  32591

The Absentee Ballot can only be submitted by one individual with a General Membership, or the one designated voter of an Ensemble Membership. 

BALLOTS MUST BE RECEIVED BY FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 2017. 

Have questions? Contact us at info@sundayschild.org.